The Baptist Page.net, Dynamic Bible Translations
"So when you give to the poor, do not sound a trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, so that they may be honored by men. Truly I say to you, they have their reward in full (Mat 6:2, NASB)."

There are several hundred translations of the Holy Bible, which could be good or bad depending on how you look at it. Have you ever wondered why so many translations and what the difference between them is? We did, so we decided to see what we could find out. There are four general types of Biblical translations; literal, paraphrase, thought-for-thought, and those that are a combination of these or just don't fit any particular category. We've tried our best to put the various translations in the proper category (difficult since a word-for-word translation is almost impossible), and for those that we were not able to categorize or that are poor translations we have an "Other" category. Please email us with your comments and, if you can, to fill in some of the blanks, as we'd like to be accurate. Below you'll see links to pages that include the different types of translations (literal, thought-for-thought, paraphrase, or other) and a listing of the translations we have looked at so far below that. This page includes the translations that are classified as paraphrases, meaning that the scripture was first translated into English then reworded. Be careful with this type of translation as a biased text, meaning the inclusion of non-biblical wording or the restructuring of the text to show a certain viewpoint, is a danger. Click on the links to find out more about the translation and how that translation depicts John 3:16. You'll also find a link to some information on the original texts used in translations and other information on our Bible Translation Information page. Please understand that we did not gather most of this information, and that it came from a variety of sources (with permission). Please let us know if you feel anything here is incorrect so we can check it out.

Interested in learning how to translate Scripture yourself? You can find books on how to translate or on eBay.

............Literal.............Thought-For-Thought.............Paraphrase.............Other

1. An American Translation (AAT)  9. New Century Version (NCV)
2. Bible in Worldwide English (BWE)  10. New Life Version (NLV)
3. Children’s King James Version, also known as the Seaside Bible (CKJV)  11. New Living Translation (NLT)
4. EasyEnglish Bible (EEB)  12. Phillips New Testament in Modern English (Phi)
5. Good News Translation (GNT) or Good News Bible (GNB) 13. Seaside Bible, also known as the Children’s King James Version (CKJV)
6. The International English Bible, also known as the Simple English Bible (SEB)  14. Simple English Bible, also known as the International English Bible (SEB)
7. Living Bible (TLB)  15. Today’s English Version (TEV)
8. The Message (MSG) 

1. An American Translation (AAT) - For God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, so that no one who believes in him should be lost, but that they should all have eternal life.
First published in 1935, the AAT was an attempt to translate the scriptures into common, everyday English. Primarily using the Masoretic Text for the Old Testament and the Greek texts of Westcott and Hort for the New Testament, the Old Testament was translated by J. M. Powis Smith and others, and the New Testament by Edgar Goodspeed. A paraphrase, this translation was criticized for it’s approach to the translation.

2. Bible in Worldwide English (BWE) - God loved the world so very, very much that he gave his only Son. Because he did that, everyone who believes in him will not lose his life, but will live for ever.
Translated by Annie Cressman, a Canadian Bible teacher in Liberia, Africa and first published in 1969, the Bible in Worldwide English (BWE) was designed to be easily readable in easily readable, modern English. The BWE is based on the King James Version (KJV) which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus.

3. Children’s King James Version, also known as the Seaside Bible (CKJV) – John 3:16 not available.
A modern language update of the original King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. The purpose of this translation was to update and modernize the original KJV in a format that children could understand. This translation was first published in 1960.

4. EasyEnglish Bible (EEB) - God loved the people in this world so much that he gave his only Son. So everyone who believes in him will never really die. Instead, they will have eternal life.
Existing only as a virtual Bible on the Internet and free to download, the EasyEnglish Bible (EEB) seeks to translate the scriptures in easy-to-read English. This translation also includes a great deal of footnotes and annotations, and was first available in 2001, although there is work still being done.

5. Good News Translation (GNT) or Good News Bible (GNB) - For God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not die but have eternal life.
The Good News Translation (GNT) as it is known in North America, or the Good News Bible (GNB) as it is known in the rest of the world, is an English language translation of the Bible by the American Bible Society, first published as the New Testament under the name Good News for Modern Man in 1966. It was anglicised into British English by the British & Foreign Bible Society with the use of metric measurements for the Commonwealth market. In North America it was formerly known as Today's English Version (TEV) but in 2001 was renamed the Good News Translation. This translation is a paraphrase translated from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek.

6. The International English Bible, also known as the Simple English Bible (SEB) - John 3:16 not available.
Translated by Dr. Stanley Morris and first published in 1980, the Simple English Bible was restricted to only 3,000 words and common, modern sentence structure. A paraphrase, there has been criticism and a questioning of its accuracy.

7. Living Bible (TLB) - For God loved the world so much that He gave his only Son so that anyone who believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.
The Living Bible, first published in 1971, is a paraphrase of the American Standard Version (ASV), which is rooted in the work that was done with the Revised Version (RV), which was a revised version of the King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus, and was written by Kenneth Taylor. Taylor made this translation primarily for children, in an attempt to make the Bible more readily understood.

8. The Message (MSG) - "This is how much God loved the world: He gave his Son, his one and only Son. And this is why: so that no one need be destroyed; by believing in him, anyone can have a whole and lasting life.
This paraphrase was translated using the rhythms and tone of contemporary English to communicate to the modern reader. First published in 2002, this translation uses the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek.

9. New Century Version (NCV) - God loved the world so much that he gave his one and only Son so that whoever believes in him may not be lost, but have eternal life.
Published by the World Bible Translation Center in 1991, the New Century Version (NCV) was published after the success of the International Children’s Bible (ICB), also published by the World Bible Translation Center. The ICB was written at a 3rd grade level using modern weights and measurements and current names for places whose names may have changed if applicable. Although written at a higher grade level, the NCV also includes this practice and gives explanations for ancient customs when deemed necessary. This translation can be considered a paraphrase of the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts.

10. New Life Version (NLV) - John 3:16 not available.
First published in 1986, the NLV is billed as a literal translation, but is in actuality not quite that. What the translator considers to be obscene words are changed (similar to the Webster translation), words are limited to one meaning (i.e. the word “great” is limited to something good. Using it to describe a “great storm” wouldn’t be done), some translated sentences are changed to make them easier to read, and measurements are stated in a way that would be understood internationally.

11. New Living Translation (NLT) - “For God loved the world so much that he gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.
A dynamic equivalent translation with roots in The Living Bible. The purpose of this translation "was to enhance the power and clarity of The Living Bible" and create a "translation as good for study as it is for devotional reading". This translation can be considered a paraphrase, and is translated from the original Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic texts.

12. Phillips New Testament in Modern English (Phi) - For God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, so that every one who believes in him shall not be lost, but should have eternal life.
Translated from the Greek Testament Phillips New Testament in Modern English had its beginnings during World War II in England’s bomb shelters when Anglican clergyman J. B. Phillips began rewording the Epistles for his church’s youth group to make them easier for the children to understand. Published in 1947 under the title “Letters to Young Churches,” Phillips followed with the Gospels in 1952, Acts  in 1955 and changed the title to “The Young Church in Action,” and in 1957 he added the Book of Revelation. Finishing the rest of the New Testament and publishing it in 1958, this translation never achieved widespread acclaim, but does have many who enjoy his distinctly British translation.

13. Seaside Bible, also known as the Children’s King James Version (CKJV) – John 3:16 not available.
A modern language update of the original King James Version (KJV), which was translated from the Masoretic Text and the Textus Receptus. The purpose of this translation was to update and modernize the original KJV in a format that children could understand. This translation was first published in 1960.

14. Simple English Bible, also known as the International English Bible (SEB) - John 3:16 not available.
Translated by Dr. Stanley Morris and first published in 1980, the Simple English Bible was restricted to only 3,000 words and common, modern sentence structure. A paraphrase, there has been criticism and a questioning of its accuracy.

15. Today’s English Version (TEV) - For God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not die but have eternal life.
Now known as the Good News Translation, this Bible is an English language translation of the Bible by the American Bible Society, first published as the New Testament under the name Good News for Modern Man in 1966. It was anglicised into British English by the British & Foreign Bible Society with the use of metric measurements for the Commonwealth market. In North America it was formerly known as Today's English Version (TEV) but in 2001 was renamed the Good News Translation. This translation is a paraphrase translated from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek.


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